The Alphabet’s Book of Colors: Supplemental Notes For Philipp Otto Runge’s Die Farbenkugel (Reality Beach 2016)

This collection of experimental visual poetry is printed on Canson Teintes 96 pound paper and hand-cut into a package of 10 9″ x 5″ cards. These cards are packaged in a a bright orange envelope which is then sealed with wax.



Farewell Materials  Cover

Farewell Materials (Lithic Press 2015)

“A calm testimony to time and the ways we repeat ourselves, Kyle Harvey’s “Farewell Materials” operates through echoes, with each reiterated phrase navigating its varying contexts to achieve broader meaning. If the collection’s opening page—“Adagio, let’s say // three // slow // beats // or so”—is equal parts request and statement of mood, then its final pages channel the older aesthetic of a record player, looping its final bit until being turned off.

Much like Harvey’s serial poem, “July,” this newer collection showcases a deep awareness of spatial minimalism and a word’s placement within. And being “a half-hearted // banjo gambler // singing // softly // to // the moon,” Kyle works with his words to craft them into sheet music, with each long caesura honoring all that waits for us in silence.

And yet, “Farewell Materials” is also the softening and hardening layers of adulthood. A prayer and a change—“for years / & years” the speaker confesses what surrounded him while he slept, the time spent waiting to reach up through the gravel. Like “bits of glass / treasured,” much of this collection is tucked away, desiring the reader like an act of extraction.” –Christopher Morgan, Nostrovia Tavern



July Cover

July (Lithic Press 2014)

“Kyle Harvey’s July sounds the space of the page the world pivots around. It walks through every room of a redacted sky. It is “a language (inside of a language).” It is a ghost making grave rubbings. July is listening. July is alive.”       – Eric Baus, The Tranquilized Tongue (City Lights Books)

“Kyle Harvey’s July is a restrained jaunt deep into its weird sluice. Reading it is like looking at a solar eclipse.”          – Ed Skoog, Rough Day (Copper Canyon Press)

“Kyle Harvey’s July activates for its reader what the month of the July feels like in December, how warmth’s sensation feels when it’s dark and cold and dreary out. When Harvey writes “July is truth is/ the color of teeth/wealth/ & well/of clear water,” his “July” is a stand-in for everything that humanity lies about during its perpetual search for the “clear water” of truth. Like so many of the poetic foremothers and fathers that he namechecks at the beginning of the collection, Harvey’s poetry searches not for meaning but the meaning of meaning; “Queen of Black Oil/ don’t ask me//what I mean//meaning/ is the murder of process.” July isn’t a chapbook full of poems about the month of the July. It’s a chapbook full of poems about what the month of July felt like before there was a language to describe it, before July’s sweaty presence found July’s sweaty word. Harvey’s words are honeyed against the elements and, like it or not, linger in your mouth long afterwards.”          – Jeff Alessandrelli, This Last Time Will Be The First, Burnside Review

“Essentially empty of narrative elements, July lets the objects speak for the interior life of the speaker. “Don’t ask me / what I mean / meaning / is the murder of process,” serves as a mission statement for July. Kyle Harvey can certainly feel a feeling and reflect those feelings.”           – Sean Shearer, Editor-in-Chief, BOAAT PRESS



Hyacinth Cover

Hyacinth (Lithic Press 2013)

Hyacinth was a finalist for the Colorado Book Award and winner of the Mark Fischer Poetry Prize.

“The curvature of Hyacinth pulls you in, like gravity — waking up in bed wearing hip waders, holy static, Coho salmon pink brassieres and the tight black leather of night. Cast after cast, Kyle Harvey bends his pole to the magnet of Monet’s sunrise and reels in fresh catches, clenched fists, the ricochet of ravens at play.”       -Art Goodtimes

“It shows great originality, brilliant command of language, complex and erudite meaning, imaginative and sustained use of metaphor, and tremendous musicality. It takes the Greek myth of Hyacinth and transforms it into an elegy that is at once a dirge and a praise poem for the regenerative power of spring. I love how skillfully the poet has used theme and variations, repetition (reminiscent of Poe’s “The Bells”), internal and slant rhymes, and unexpected rhythm shifts. This is the mature, polished work of a highly skilled and imaginative writer.”                -Wayne Lee, Judge, 2013 Mark Fischer Poetry Prize